Should Brielle Caruso Have a Baby?

Buying viagra in amsterdam by viagra without prescription

4 stars based on 166 reviews
Zithromax is not expected to harm an unborn baby.

Bisoprolol 5mg und viagra


A kezelés későbbi szakában csökken és a kezelés előttinél alacsonyabb szinten stabilizálódik a perifériás érellenállás - e jelenség mechanizmusa nem teljesen ismert. If not taking daily won't be effective for either. Question: My doctor prescribed Prednisone to reduce symptoms of colitis. CrCl <10mL/min or hemodialysis: initially 2.5mg once daily. Nearly all patients with parathyroid problems have symptoms.

Buy viagra online


Video 5 Fünffache Grand-Slam-Siegerin "Nicht auf die Liste geschaut": Hier legt Maria Scharapowa ihre Doping-Beichte ab Als Maria Scharapowa zu einer Pressekonferenz in Los Angeles einlud, wurde über ein mögliches Karriereende der Tennisspielerin spekuliert. Mais, how to get prescribed viagra online jamais ils ne mentionnent les indications, contre-indications, les interactions médicamenteuses, les effets secondaires, l’utilisation sécuritaire des médicaments et al. Il est méga rapide et, buy cheap maxalt en même temps, une longue action, qui donnera à vous et à votre compagnon un sexe plein et très intense ! If you would like more information, can i legally buy viagra online from canada talk with your doctor. Avoid abrupt cessation; if discontinuing, viagra online amazon withdraw gradually over 1 week or longer. Missing the drug for consecutive days quickly (in ~40 hours) triggered a single withdrawal symptom: brain zaps. The ability of tetracyclines to chelate with divalent cations such as iron, buy nizagara however, varies depending on the particular antibiotic and when the antibiotic is administered with regard to the iron-containing product. Les certains patients, purchase viagra online no prescription qui prenaient dans le spécialiste Viagra 100 mgs, ont en prenant caractérisé une amélioration de la rangée sexuelle, le Medikation. If follow-up/compliance uncertain, buy viagra online bingo game desensitize patient and treat with penicillin. Avoid rushing dehydrated patients with proximal limbs. The Golden age has inspired us in many ways with its wise leaders. N-iodo-succinimide (8 g, buy levothroid online no prescription 35.6 mmol) was added portionwise to reaction solution over 2 hr. Certaine personne ont une densité osseuse basse, colchicine buy online uk mais ne se cassent jamais. So someone who has a reading of 132/88 mm Hg (often... And you can take the drug in a hassle free manner. Hola Meri, gracias por tus respuestas, me estas ayudando muchísimo. "Lady Gaga Says Cher's Outfits Inspired Her Own Crazy Style".

Cialis viagra cost


Whilst many people try and spice up their s ex life by taking drugs, buy purim gifts you should only ever take Sildenafil if you are suffering from an inability to get and sustain an erection. [64] [27] He has also fought Taskmaster and surprised him with armed combat. Brand equity is strategically crucial, but famously difficult to quantify. (1) During a period of cocaine withdrawal, viagra 50 mg duration she began substituting her husband’s gabapentin for cocaine, and noted it helped with her craving, relaxed her, and imparted a “laid back” feeling. This is not a complete list of side effects that can occur with lisinopril. The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. De cette façon, buying viagra in amsterdam vous pouvez éviter des quéstions intimes désagréables qui provoquent la peur chez des hommes. Tiefer calls herself a “sexologist”: she has been studying human sexuality for four decades. In this update, buying viagra in amsterdam the strength of evidence for effectiveness outcomes was improved from low to moderate and we confirmed that the symptomatic benefit of doxycycline is minimal to non-existent, while the small benefit in terms of joint space narrowing is of questionable clinical relevance and outweighed by safety problems. In the wake of Furman, Georgia amended its capital punishment statute, but chose not to narrow the scope of its murder provisions. Nevertheless, plasma lithium levels should be monitored with appropriate adjustment to the lithium dose in accordance with standard clinical practice. You do not need to begin a site, comprar viagra en farmacia sin receta en chile but begin publishing your content with a perfect plan. antabuse 250mg kaufen in deutschland Vorsitzender der therapie, buy shuddha guggulu side effects sagte händler zum. [242 ]​ En el siguiente álbum, promethazine codeine where to buy The Fame Monster (2009), Gaga mostró su gusto por las imitaciones y en el álbum se ve « glam rock y arena de los setenta, disco de ABBA desenfadado e imitaciones edulcoradas de Stacey Q». What was remarkable about Truss's report was drawing the relationship between clinical depression, a "mental" disorder and yeast, an infective organism usually associated only with superficial human infections. Available online at http://www.mayoclinic.com/print/microalbumin/MY00143/METHOD=print&DSECTION=all through http://www.mayoclinic.com. My grandma says she knows how I feel when I knit my brows. Nonmedicinal ingredients: calcium carboxymethylcellulose, can i buy viagra over the counter in ireland cornstarch, hydroxypropyl cellulose, iron oxide, lactose, magnesium stearate, and polyethylene glycol. When the right combination of amino acids is linked together, can you get arrested for buying viagra the amino acid chain folds together into a protein with a specific shape and the right chemical features together to enable it to perform a particular function or reaction. Cette substance stimule la relaxation des muscles lisses du pénis, where can i order save genuine viagra augmente les artères de sang et le flux sanguin dans le pénis. MAZ-79221, viagra online norge 1996, 16x16, from Minsk, Belarus, built under the brand MZKT Volat (Minsk Wheeled Tractor Plant, since 1991). To view the blood-brain/blood-CSF barrier as a simple lipid membrane surrounding the CNS, viagra to buy cheap however, is too simplistic. Hiring a woman recommended by a Clergyman or even her parents might rank higher than a women trying on her own to get hired. In patients taking antidepressants for the treatment of pain at the time of screening, where can i buy xenical pills such medications were stopped for at least three weeks before the base-line observations began. Средство можно купить в форме таблеток, order viagra from mexico расфасованных по 10 штук в блистеры. Approximately 15—25% of both drugs are metabolized. Esophagitis and esophageal ulcerations have been reported in patients receiving capsule and tablet forms of drugs in the tetracycline-class. The treatment for renovascular hypertension is revascularisation. Ihre Auswahl wird bei der Eingabe gespeichert – Sie brauchen einfach nur auf "x" zu klicken, um dieses Fenster zu schließen, wenn Sie fertig sind. • ^ Miller, buying viagra in amsterdam Michael E.; Moyer, Justin Wm (15 October 2015).

Order viagra in canada on line


However, they are more common in middle-aged people, in dark-skinned people, and in females. Patients with these conditions may have a higher chance for getting a blood disorder called thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura/hemolytic uremic syndrome (TTP/HUS). Daily fluctuations in self-control demands and alcohol intake. How does Cialis compare with other drugs for erectile dysfynction? L'attesa di 45 minuti è in effetti eccitante perché so ciò che sta per succedere. His son, where to buy cleocin cream Carmen, caught the substitution and called the pharmacy. For use in beef cattle, dairy cattle, calves, and swine. Stress incontinence of urine in women: physiologic treatment. Murphy reported on symptoms that differentiate PANS from other childhood-onset illnesses. Contact your health-care provider immediately if you suspect that you have a medical problem. Our focus at San Diego Sexual Medicine is on you, amantadine buy 2014 the patient. Petula Clark aged 81 and issuing albums and touring, star of Finian’s rainbow and Good bye Mr Chips. Full induction of the system occurred at a concentration of 10 ng/mL of 9-t-butyl doxycycline. it didn't even help her pain either but that is not really relevant.

2017: A Year In Review

The key takeaway from 2017 – NOTHING MAKES SENSE!

Everything I thought would happen didn’t, and the unexpected – good and bad – happened in full force!


The Different Moods of 2017

This is how I started the year feeling. I was all over the place.

By mid-year this mood kicked in…

And by the end, this is exactly where I’m at (thanks Suzy).

BLC Communications

I landed what would be my favorite consulting gig at MKTG in Q1…creative and passionate people and a very fun project to work on. How many times do you see branded soda machines with adorable little super hero characters?

A Return to Moet Hennessy 

I worked at Moet Hennessy, USA in my twenties. What a ride! I began on the Hennessy brand, worked on 10 Cane Rum, Glenmorangie Scotch, and Belvedere Vodka. I left to work at Serralles, USA and eventually opened my own consulting firm but had the amazing opportunity to return as the Hennessy V.S Brand Director. Going back to where it all started….

I got to join in the ranks of these extraordinary folks.

My first day was my birthday, March 27th, and I must say it was pretty amazing. The day started in Las Vegas with a helicopter ride through the Grand Canyon and VCP Champagne. A pretty incredible way to meet my team.

There was an amazing trip to Cognac to see the Hennessy distillery and experience the history first hand.

I even had the privilege to meet Roch Hennessy.

…and see the archives.

Back on US Soil, I organized a team building day at the DogPound where we boxed out our aggressions. Yes, I have a boot on…

I also had the honor of participating in the launch of Hennessy V.S Limited Edition with Jon One.

Had another fantastic trip to Champagne in June. I’m still in the boot!

And in the summer I enjoyed an educational market visit to Florida.

By the end of the summer, I moved into the role of Experiential Marketing Director for the Hennessy Portfolio.

In November, I was thrilled to have Hennessy participate in Hopeland’s annual gala. The organization finds loving homes for children, a cause very close to my heart.

Year end dinners were celebratory, although some were bittersweet as some people left the Moet Hennessy family.

And I had the great fortune of closing out the year with the Hennessy team at our delicious holiday lunch at my favorite Italian restaurant in NY, Carbone.

My Best Friend’s Wedding

My best friend, Linda, had her fabulous NY Bachelorette Party in March and we danced the night away! (Eddie the Eagle?)

She married Adam Ponsi in April and her wedding was epic on every level. Linda, thank you for making me your made of honor. It was my honor to be by your side! Love you.

*Food*

The story of my life…

Keith and I experienced the chicken parm pizza at Quality Italian with Cristina + Ralph Racanelli. We loved it so much we went back with Linda and Adam.

Can’t say enough about the bagel at Nur. This was a delicious experience with Linda and John.

Who says you can’t have it all? Champagne, pizza and a pierogi!

4 Charles’ 40oz Prime Rib – MEAT, MEAT, MEAT!

Discovered the best duck in NY at Decoy (thanks Orit!)

Although I love Carbone, there is nothing like a home cooked Italian meal with homemade red sauce. Cristina, thank you for this amazing meal.

Ayurvedic Cuisine at Divya’s with Orit.

I had my 2 extraordinary moms – Karen + Diane – come together for a cook off where they made their famous recipes and I took a ton of notes! The output = 3 days worth of delicious meals my dad got to taste test.

The Grill – Keith and my 9 year wedding Anniversary meal.

Beyond proud of Simon Kim, my brother from another (Korean) mother. What a tremendous year. He closed Piora, opened Cote, won another Michelin star, had a baby girl and serves some of the best steak I’ve ever tasted.

Pu Pu Platters and Wonton Soup with sliced pork. The way it’s supposed to be.

The NoMad’s Chicken with Cooper.

Hillstone – Trish and John 🙂

Emmy’s: Burger, Detroit-style pizza and the rice krispy treat dessert.

Love useful food pairings!

I’d like the dover sole. He’ll have the branzino…

My Family: Keith and Rambo

Rambo and Paulie – Grumpy old men.

Our trip to Aruba. We didn’t get to do a lot of personal travel this year but this vacation was so relaxing and a good mid-year reset.

Keith and I continue our broadway nights where we usually start with wine, then move to champagne, then scotch and if ambitious tequila. Over the course of 5 hours, we sing all our favorite show tunes, dance around our apartment with Rambo, or if warm, sing on our balcony. We usually end with an order from our local 24 hour diner.

Keith’s Bday with polish cuisine.

Rocking out at Linda and Adam’s wedding!

Date night for my 36th birthday.

Keith’s Christmas Decor – Disco lights in the apartment surrounded by ‘spirits’

My handsome 13 year old dog child.

Our annual holiday tradition of fancy cocktails in our favorite NY Hotels. He still fits in his tux from our wedding (9 years ago) and I rocked my mom’s dress (the one that as a daughter I use to think she was a princess in).

Rutgers Tailgating and Football

Yeah, we’re still tailgating with the greatest crew.

Things That Made Me Smile in 2017

Leaf cookies, walkman (felt like Star Lord), the baby boys, and this Christmas card.

Love you, mean it!

JLC.

Being able to work and play in this extraordinary city.

The JC Crew.

Powered by Pizza!

The ability to leave freezing NY for sunny Miami.

The BNBs.

Housewarming Parties.

Coffee & Wine.

The Eclipse.

The DogPound – best workout on the planet.

The Caruso’s – this was quite a Q4 for my family but it was a reminder that you will do anything for your loved ones. I truly have the craziest, but most amazing parents. And Nicole, we just need you to continue to watch over us.

The Witek’s – I am truly blessed to have such supportive and loving in-laws. Thank you for all your help this year.

What I Learned

Because I’m an obsessive, hyper-detailed type A personality, I had quite a wake up call this year. I questioned the way I was leading my life and what I was prioritizing. Was what I considered success a few years ago ‘success’ now? By conventional definitions, you could say I was successful but when you had a year filled with health mishaps – 4 broken ribs and a broken left foot forcing me to wear a very sexy (insert sarcastic face) boot for 4 months, 2 ER trips for my hypertension, and a surgery, I would say I didn’t feel that way.


I will admit, up to the age of thirty, I needed conventional successes to create structure. After thirty, everything I’ve learned has been from failure, rejection, humility, and vulnerability. I think that’s how your soul expands. Admittedly, I don’t always like it, but I realize the acceptance and perhaps surrendering to it makes me realize how strong I actually am.

There were a few key learnings I took away this year that I hope in my sharing helps you.

  • Sometimes you need to simply listen.

  • When people become multi sensory, they become more aware. That’s why I love traveling to new places because it forces me to engage all my senses and I actually feel more alive and alert, no longer operating on auto-pilot.
  • It never hurts to see the good in someone. They often act better because of it. Make people feel valued, seen, heard, and treat them with reverence and respect. You will bring out the best in them.
  • There is power in vulnerability and trust.
  • We live in a scarcity culture – nothing is enough. We are not good enough. We are not thin enough. We are not safe enough. I challenge that now. I think we have enough if we allow ourselves to enjoy the moment

  • It’s ok to surrender to the hurt, loss, resentment and disappointment. Accept it because it did happen, and now it’s done.
  • The energy we put out is the energy we get back – the law of attraction.
  • Get rid of the disease to please. Not worth it cause you’re never going to make everyone happy. You must make yourself happy.
  • You are in control of 2 things: how to prepare for what might happen and how to respond to what just happened.
  • Success is being healthy, living a life you admire and finding inner peace.
  • When I have a comparison moment, I now ask: What am I trying to prove, to whom and for what?
  • Nothing Makes Sense 

My hopes for 2018

I have a lot of ambitions for 2018 and hope for a healthy, balanced year.

introduce

I don’t want to let a moment pass without my acknowledgement and full experience of it. I plan to stay mindful, grateful and hope to entertain, enlighten and uplift those around me. #3QT

Stay inspired and cheers to 2018.

Love,

Brielle

8 Delicious Gluten Free Recipes from Positive Health Wellness

It’s been almost half a year since I’ve posted. So naturally, what do I write about? FOOD! The love for all forms of consumption continues, but I have learned there needs to be a balance.

In an effort to find delicious recipes that are easy to make, I came across a great site: Positive Health Wellness.

Not only does the site address diet + nutrition / recipes, it includes beauty, fitness and pain relief advise. It’s a great resource.

Back to the food…. Here are 8 delicious, unique, gluten-free recipes that will be a hit at any social function! I just made the pineapple and ginger pavlova. It certainly satisfied my sweet tooth!

Enjoy and #stayinspired!

Guide to Charleston, South Carolina

This post is dedicated to Jonathan Libutti. He fueled my interest to visit this city and I am forever grateful for the recommendations he gave me.

The food has a distinct flavor, the weather is warm, and the people are charming. Charleston has been voted best city in the U.S. numerous times in numerous publications and secured #1 in the world in Travel and Leisure. So what is it about this city that beats New York, Paris, Hong Kong and the other behemoths?

1) The Lowcountry Cuisine: Charleston’s restaurant scene is gaining national attention for its distinctly southern flavors, uniquely modern restaurants, and talented newcomer chefs. Local ingredients have always been a point of pride for area restaurants, and in recent years Charleston’s finest have rallied behind a standard of using only fresh, locally sourced foods. Charleston is known for comfort foods with a Gullah influence, and famous for such dishes as Shrimp and Grits and She-crab soup.

2)  Historic Homes: Early in Charleston’s history, the city collected property tax on the street width of the house, rather than the length, creating a preference for the long, narrow houses that are signature Charleston style homes today.  Almost every home on Charleston’s peninsula is historic. Beautifully colored antebellum mansion homes can be found on East Bay on Rainbow Row, and at the Battery on Murray and South Battery streets. Most of these picturesque dwellings also contain shady secret courtyards and black ironwork gates.

3) Southern Hospitality: A town raised with “Yes, sir” and “Yes, ma’am,” Charleston demonstrates its southern hospitality in every aspect of life.  Hotels in Charleston go above and beyond the usual amenities you’d expect, with many offering complimentary wine and cheese receptions in the afternoons, and cookies and milk in the evenings.

4) Beaches: While Charleston’s downtown itself is a harbor town, three beaches are located just a short drive off the peninsula. Isle of Palms, the furthest beach from downtown, is full of upscale beach condos and remains relatively uncrowded most of the year. Sullivan’s Island, only about 15 – 20 minutes away by car, is a flat sand beach with beautiful homes and rentals, unique bars and restaurants, and is the home of Fort Moultrie, a defensive fort used in both Revolutionary and Civil wars. Folly Beach, a 20-minute’s ride away on James Island, is most popular with college students and Charleston vacationers.

5) American History: Called the Holy City for its many church steeples and historically early religious tolerance, Charleston’s great tale begins when King Charles the second of England chartered Carolina to his 8 Lords Proprietors. Established in 1670, Charleston fell victim to attack in the centuries to come by Native Americans, Pirates like the “Gentleman Pirate” Stede Bonnet, and throughout the War of 1812, and American Revolutionary and Civil Wars. Visit historical sites like Ft. Sumter in the Charleston harbor, to stand where the first shots of the Civil War were fired.

Hotel:

  • Planters Inn: Elegant, with a southern style and amazing amenities. Located in the Historic District, it’s in the middle of everything (read: you can walk everywhere)

Dining – Respect the Food:

  • Hank & Hyman Seafood: The She-crab soup is a must. It’s Charleston’s signature dish made from the sweet meat from the female crab. The Carolina Delight takes grits to a new level – fried, cheese, more cheese. And the build your own platters are magnificent.

  • Jestines: Old southern cooking. Always a line. Classic soul food: fried everything, cornbread, and the blue collar special (peanut butter and banana sandwich with potato chips)

  • Anson: The crab and brie fondue, fried green tomatoes, catfish and chicken under the brick are delicious!
  • Husk: The bar serves Pappy! The focus is ingredient-driven cuisine and was 2011’s Best New Restaurant in America by Bon Appetit Magazine. The menu changes but get the corn bread. The Carolina Heritage Pork is very flavorful and the Short Rib is succulent.

  • Hank’s Seafood (next to Planter’s Inn): Located in a turn of the century warehouse, the ingredients are as fresh as they come and the seafood is divine.
  • Peninsula Grill @ Planter’s Inn: Totally romantic with flickering lanterns and a historic brick alleyway. To start, you cannot go wrong with the lobster 3 way (ravioli, tempura, and sautéed) and the she-crab soup. Their steaks are outstanding with an assortment of beautiful sauces of all flavors to accompany the decadent meat. (Ginger-Lime Beurre Blanc?) And where else could you get a wreckfish? Although I’m not a dessert person, their Ultimate Coconut Cake is off the hook.

  • FIG: Local, fresh eatery that services a Provencal fish stew and a roasted tilefish! The rabbit pie is also a distinct dish.
  • McCrady’s Tavern (George Washington Spot): This was Keith’s favorite. A favorite of notable Charlestonians before/during/after the American Revolution, this establishment hosted a grand 30-course dinner for President George Washington in 1791. The calf’s head soup is one to try.

  • Hominy Grill: With a James Beard award winning chef, the entire appetizer menu is worthy – jalapeno hushpuppies, fried chicken basket, fried green tomatoes, okra & shrimp beignets… where do you stop?

 Drinking:

  • YoBo: “Healthy Mexican” with the legendary Mason Jar Margarita: double shot of gold tequila and margarita mix.
  • Charleston Harbor Resort’s: Blended mudslide cocktail
  • Mercantile & Mash: All about American spirits. 120 whiskeys, including limited releases and single-barrel and cask-strength offerings.

 

Must See / Excursions:

  • King St – For all your shopping needs

  • Rainbow Row: Window shop for mansions

  • Museum of Charleston

  • Meeting sweetgrass basket weavers at the Charleston City Market – yes we bought one and I store my chargers in it

  • Horse and Buggy Tour: Historic District, Ft. Sumner/Park
  • Boone Hall

  • Candle Store across street from Planters Inn Hotel (can’t remember the name!) – the most amazing scents.
  • The Holy City Salt Scrub @ Hyman Seafood – best salt scrub ever!

  • Hug a really big tree!

#stayinspired

First Aid Travel

After all my travel experiences, I have learned bringing a first aid/prevention kit is imperative for any length trip. I’m known to carry my little ‘pharmacy’ pouch in my purse on a daily basis. There is no way I’m going away without the proper precautions when traveling domestic or abroad.

firstaid

Essentials:

  1. A list of your prescriptions (in case you lose them). If you are traveling abroad, translate them in advance to the language.
  2. Pain and fever reducers (Advil, Tylenol)
  3. Hydrocortisone cream for bug bites / rashes
  4. Bandages
  5. IF you have heart problems, a copy of your most recent EKG – yeah, I bring mine
  6. Antihistamines for allergies
  7. Tweezers, small scissors, adhesive tape, alcohol wipes
  8. Rehydration powder (I like packets of Adventure Medical Kits’ oral rehydration salts)
  9. PH Drops
  10. Back up power battery which can juice up your phone or camera battery on the go
  11. Sunscreen
  12. Imodium in case you have a run-in with the porcelain god

Depending on where you travel, you should consider the following:

  1. Travel Insurance
  2. Antibiotics
  3. Wet wipes and toilet paper
  4. Emergency contraception
  5. Iodine tablets in case you have to purify water in an emergency
  6. Dramamine for when you get queasy on those bumpy roads or rough water

Enjoy your travel adventures and #stayinspired

When Life Hands You Lemons…

Life has handed us all lemons…so what do you do when it happens?

lemon-slices

Put A Sliced Lemon Next to Your Bed At Night:

  • Few scents are as refreshing as a lemon.
  • Slice it into quarters and sprinkle some salt on it. Done!
  • Put those slices on your nightstand and brace yourself for these benefits:
    • Stress Relief: The smell of citrus relaxes one’s brain waves and emotions.
    • Increased Focus: If you’re an insomniac whose brain tends to race all over the place – like me – a good night’s sleep is dependent on focusing on positive things and relaxation exercises that will get you to a state of rest. That’s where the focus-boosting lemon fragrance does its job!
    • Better Breathing: Let the gentle scent of that anti-oxidizing, anti-bacterial fruit waft through your nostrils and sleep.
    • Buh-bye Insects: Tired of mosquitoes making a meal of you at night? Or maybe it’s that fly buzzing around your ear that’s got you going insane. Fear no more! Lemon repels all sorts of insects!
    • Increased Energy & Positivity By Morning: I know, morning is the last thing you want to think about as you climb into bed. But those slices on your nightstand will make wake-up time a lot less painful. That’s because the smell of lemon boosts your brain’s serotonin levels.
    • Improved Air Quality: When’s the last time you thought about your home’s air quality? Not sure? Lemon not only smells great – it also purifies air. It’s so powerful you can use it to draw paint fumes out of a room.
    • Blood Pressure Reduction: Considering many American’s suffer from high blood pressure – myself included – this little lemon comes in handy.

Make Warm Turmeric Water with Lemon:

Tea cup with lemon on a wooden table

Turmeric is known for its anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. Curcumin or the active ingredient of turmeric is a powerful antioxidant which can provide many health benefits. Try turmeric water – which has numerous healing properties – and combine it with lemon juice.

Ingredients:

  • ½ teaspoon of turmeric
  • ½ lemon
  • Organic honey
  • Warm water

Directions:

You need to squeeze the lemon juice into a glass and pour the warm water into it. Then, mix it along with the turmeric. Add the honey and make sure to mix them well. Enjoy!

Benefits of Turmeric Water:

  1. Keeps Diabetes in check

Turmeric has the ability to regulate insulin resistance and to prevent diabetes type 2. It is very important to consult your doctor before using it because when it is combined with certain medications, it can cause some side-effects such as hypoglycemia.

  1. Anti-inflammatory and Antioxidant properties
  2. Relieves Arthritis
  3. Prevents Heart Disease
  4. Prevents Cancer

Drink Lemon Water Every Morning on an Empty Stomach

There are numerous health benefits to this daily practice due to the fact that water keeps the body hydrated and removes toxins while lemon contains essential nutrients like calcium, iron, potassium, vitamin C, A, and B-complex, pectin fiber, carbohydrates and proteins.  Lemons also have the powerful antibacterial, antiviral and immunity boosting properties along with citric acid. The most important benefits from this simple practice are:

  • Boosts Immune System
  • Cleanses the Urinary Tract
  • Improves Digestion
  • Increases Skin Health
  • Helps Weight Loss
  • Controls High Blood Pressure
  • Boosts Energy
  • Balances pH Levels
  • Treats Throat Infections
  • Treats Bad Breath

New Leaf Wellness’ 31 Paleo-Friendly Crockpot Freezer Meals

These meals get me through the gloomy winter season! I usually have 2 crock pots going at a time every Sunday to prep for the week.

New Leaf Wellness made a list of Paleo-friendly crockpot recipes that are:

▪ Freezer-friendly (they can last up to 3 months)
▪ Dairy-free
▪ Grain-free and gluten-free
▪ Soy-free
▪ Sugar-free (with the exception of honey)
▪ Free of processed foods (except canned tomatoes)

Here’s the link, and list – enjoy and #stayinspired. Steve Skladany, I dedicate this post to you!

http://newleafwellness.biz/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/31-Paleo-Crockpot-Freezer-Meals-Recipes-Grocery-List.pdf

crock-pot

1. Chicken Tortilla-Less Soup from Paleo Hacks
2. Beef and Sweet Potato Chili from One Lovely Life
3. Pot Roast with Carrots (YUM)
4. Italian Pork Roast
5. Garlic Honey Chicken with Peppers and Zucchini from Paleo Parents
6. Pineapple Salsa Verde Chicken from Mangia Paleo
7. Banana Pepper Shredded Beef
8. Hungarian Beef Stew from Perchance to Cook
9. Beef Picadillo from Rubies and Radishes
10. Seafood Boil
11. Roasted Pumpkin Coconut Soup from PaleoPot
12. Cool Ranch Shredded Chicken
13. BBQ Ribs from Ditch the Wheat
14. Pulled Pork Chili from PaleOMG
15. Stuffed Peppers
16. Hawaiian Pork Burrito Bowls from With Salt and Wit
17. Chicken Fajitas (serve on a salad instead of tortillas)
18. Chicken Vegetable Soup from Multiply Delicious
19. Paleo Mississippi Roast from Plaid & Paleo
20. Green Chile Chicken and Lime Soup from My Paleo Crockpot
21. Garlic-Mint Pork Loin
22. Simple Chicken from Paleo Leap
23. Chicken Curry (our fave! substitute cauliflower for peas)
24. Beef Fajitas
25. Beef or Turkey Chili from Paleo Newbie
26. Italian Chicken from my ALDI freezer prep session
27. Spaghetti Squash with Marinara Sauce from my October healthy crockpot post (add homemade meatballs for extra protein)
28. Beef Stew from Once a Month Meals
29. Chicken Soup with Mexican Seasonings
30. Apple Pork Tenderloin from Clean Eatz
31. Jalapeno Popper Chicken and Beef Chili from Skinnytaste

Guide to Savannah, Georgia

This post is dedicated to Forrest Gump (His famous bench is in Chippewa Square).

Yes, I know he’s a fictional character but he’s been a beloved character to millions of people. What I love about him is that he attains all of his successes through his innocence and his imperviousness to contamination by the business of living. He never negotiates his spirit regardless of his fears or insecurities. He remains authentic through and through and that is beautiful. His goal isn’t to live happily ever after, it isn’t to finish the plot, resolve the conflict and roll through the credits. He realizes there’s more to life – life is a process that we will always work on.

Savannah is an enchanting southern escape. Defining it is difficult because it has the classic southern charm with a quirkiness mixed with grace and hospitality. There is also a romance to this city that cannot be explained until you walk (this is a perfect walk anywhere city) through the beautiful squares.

*This is Keith’s favorite US city. He equates it to a classic Hollywood starlet.

1) Historic Squares: Savannah has 22 breathtaking squares with grand live oak trees and ample green space. All of the squares are located within walking distance of one another, so seeing them all in one day is doable. If you’re pressed for time, limit your journey to the picturesque squares along Bull Street.

  1. Live Oak Trees: I’m not a nature person, but these trees are massive, magnificent and hauntingly beautiful.

  1. Cemeteries: There’s no better place to learn about Savannah’s history than in her cemeteries. Colonial Park Cemetery, located in the center of the Historic District, features gravesites that date back to the mid-18th century. Laurel Grove Cemetery, on the city’s west side, is a haunting reminder of Savannah’s segregated past, with separate sections for whites and blacks, along with a Civil War burial ground for Confederate soldiers. Bonaventure Cemetery, on the city’s east side, boasts breathtaking views of the Wilmington River.

  1. St. Patrick’s Day parade: The parade, the second largest in the nation, is held every year on March 17 (except when the holiday falls on a Sunday), but expect the party to get underway a few days prior and continue until the last pint of Guinness is chugged.

Hotel:

  • Kehoe House – Exquisitely restored 1892 Renaissance Revival mansion in the historic district, this luxury bed and breakfast is quaint and beautiful. We spent our anniversary weekend here. It’s in walking distance to everything.

 

Respect the Food:

  • Huey’s: Cajun-creole cuisine that is SO good. I was obsessed with the gumbo and the crawfish etoufee.

  • Wilkes Dining Room (closed on weekends + month of Jan / cash only / no reservations): There is always a line but it’s DELICIOUS Southern home cooking. Family-owned since 1943, the lunch crowd finds seats at one of the large tables-for-ten shared by strangers. By the time the meal is over, you are no longer a stranger. Located in the same building as the original Wilkes House, the Wilkes Pied-A-Terra property is a perfect place to stay during your visit to Savannah.

  • The Olde Pink House: We had our anniversary dinner here. Savannah’s only 18th Century Mansion, the Olde Pink House was named for the beautiful shade of “pink” stucco, which covers its old brick. Food standouts? Reynolds square platter, mac and cheese poppers, pulled pork, blackened oysters and crispy fried lobster tails. Wow!

  • River Street Inn: Gorgeous for a cocktail at sunset. Was an old converted cotton house.

  • Clary’s Café: Wonderful breakfast – The Elvis! The Victorian! Country fried steak! Also, a great post-drinking morning meal.
  • Back in the Day Bakery: Fresh-baked bread, cupcakes and fork-ready pies – hearty portions at this vintage bakery & espresso bar.

Drinking:

  • Just do a bar crawl on the waterfront

Must See / Excursions:

  • Hit the cemeteries – Its strangely beautiful and peaceful
  • Forrest Gump’s bench (Chippewa Square)

  • Horse and buggy ride tour to see the city – so romantic!
  • Pop into any antique store.
  • Take one of the bus tours (if you don’t do horse and buggy) because you get to see all parts of the city and can journey back to your favorite spots. Remember it’s a walking city.

  • SCAD Museum of Art is part of the Savannah College of Art and Design, and housed in an 1853 train depot.
  • Just walk around and see what you run into!

#stayinspired

My Favorite NY Ramen Spots

This post is dedicated to Renee Iselin, my Ramen partner in crime, and Sats Gawa, a world-renowned ramen expert hailing from Japan – he knows the real deal!

It’s in my blood. I love soup, and I especially love Ramen. For me, it’s the ultimate comfort food. I have sampled some amazing ramen throughout Manhattan and wanted to share my favorites.

Zundo-Ya: The soup base has integrity. Pork bones are simmered in a special pot called a zundo (hence the name) for twenty hours, creating a thick, creamy liquid. To ensure the results are as close as possible to the broth found in Japan, the team “softens” the water using a closely guarded technique. The blend incorporates some dried fish into the sweet and salty mix, adding more umami flavor than most compounds have.

Ipuddo: In 2008, this was the place that made me fall in love with Ramen. It’s authentic Hakata tonkotsu pork soup. You cannot go wrong. Expect a wait.

Takashi: I stumbled upon this gem when my girlfriends and I wanted to try premium Japanese and American beef. The selections are delicately prepared and served raw to be grilled right at your table (yakiniku). Note: they serve a variety of very decadent meats (raw liver and flash-boiled achilles tendon). I discovered through my friend Simon Kim, owner of Piora restaurant which happens to be down the street (more on his place later!) that Takashi served a LATE NIGHT BEEF BROTH RAMEN!!!! Pure ramen heaven. Here’s the info!

Mei Jin Ramen: Hip Japanese place for ramen & izakaya-style small plates with an adjoining cocktail & dessert bar. The chicken spicy miso ramen and curry beef ramen are exhilerating.

Totto Ramen: You simply cannot go wrong with any of the ramen varieties. The assortment of additional toppings is ridiculous, and they even serve ‘specialty’ ramen. Be experimental and play with your noodles!

Hide Chan: The Tonkotsu Ramen is a rich creamy pork bone soup with thin long noodles. Tonkotsu, which means pork bone, usually has a cloudy white colored broth. because it’s made from boiling pork bones, fat, and collagen over high heat for many hours. The result is a hearty pork flavor and a creamy consistency that rivals milk, melted butter or gravy. The ramen is hearty and delicious.

Mr Taka: The ingredients are carefully selected and there is a lot of care that goes into these slurp worthy noodles. One of the owners ramen restaurant in Japan, Bigiya, was listed on Michelin Tokyo in 2015. It was the first year for Michelin Tokyo to list a ramen restaurant and there are 5000 in Japan. It’s worth a trip here.

I’m sure I’ll be adding to this list as more ramen joints open up, but for now, these are my staples. Enjoy – slurp up and #stayinspired.

La Dolce Vita! An Italian Adventure.

La Dolce Vita! An Italian Adventure in Venice, Verona, Padua, Florence, Pisa, Rome, Pompeii, Amalfi Coast, Palermo (Sicily)

This post is dedicated to my father and mother’s family: The Caruso and the Rossi Clan – I am blessed to be an “honorary” Italian.

Italy is remarkable. It’s a kaleidoscope of regions and experiences with an incomparable artistic and cultural heritage that coincide with natural wonders fueled with a feisty passion for living. Throughout Italy, the local character and color is astonishing mainly due to the survival of regionalism, old traditions, customs and lifestyles coupled with a healthy interest in food, perseverance of history/events and elaborate commemorations of everything imaginable. In summary: everything is a celebration. I could get used to living like this…

Chapter 1:  Venice

Posted on 3QT separately: http://threequartersthere.com/2016/12/venice/

Chapter 2: The Veneto Region (Verona and Padua)

Verona is a vibrant trading center and the second largest city in the Veneto region after                             Venice. It also boasts many Roman ruins, second only to those of Rome itself!

Must See / Excursions:

  • Romeo and Juliet: We are all familiar with this tragic story. At the Casa di Giulietta (Juliet’s house) No 27 Via Cappello, Romeo is said to have climbed the balcony. In reality, this is actually a restored 13th century inn, but people still line up to see (myself included). The Casa di Romeo is a few streets away and the Tomba di Giulietta is displayed in a crypt below the cloister of San Francesco al Corso on Via del Pontiere.

  • Piazza Erbe: Colorful market built on the site of the ancient Roman forum and considered the center of Verona.

  • San Zeno Maggiore Church: Unusual medieval bronze door panels with extraordinary carved scenes honoring Verona’s patron saint.
  • The town of Padua is not far from Verona and is an old university town with an illustrious academic history. It houses a major museum complex which occupies a group of 14th century monastic buildings attached to the church of the Eremitani. A must visit spot is the Cappella degli Scrovegni dating back to 1303. The frescos of Christ are stunning and reveal what a powerful influence this art was on the development of European art.

 

Chapter 3: The Tuscany Region (Florence and Pisa)

The cradle of the Renaissance, but also a vibrant witness to new forms of creativity in wine, food, fashion and artisanship, Florence is magnificent. As a writer, I was tickled pink to know that writers such as Dante, Machiavelli, and Petrarch contributed to the city’s literary heritage, though it was the paintings and sculptures of artists such as Donatello, Michelangelo, and Botticelli that turned the city into an artistic capital. I was only here for a day, but it’s a compact city and a majority of the sites can be seen on foot. (Brian and Liz Shick – thank you for the tour)

Must See / Excursions:

  • Explore San Marco area: These buildings once stood on the fringe of the city serving as stables and barracks (lions, elephants and giraffes were held there). It’s fun to see the hustle and bustle of the young Florentines.

  • Explore the Duomo area: Dante was born here! It retains its medieval feel and is home to the Baptistery, one of the city’s oldest buildings. The richly decorated Duomo – Santa Maria del Fiore has become Florence’s most famous symbol.

  • Santa Croce: This gothic church is home to the tombs of Michelangelo, Galileo, and Machiavelli. The setting is a masterpiece but realizing the company you are keeping is incredibly humbling.

  • Uffizi: Offers a chance to see the world’s greatest collection of Italian Renaissance paintings – there is nothing left to say. A must see.
  • Piazza della Signoria: The great bell used to summon citizens to public meetings and it’s a popular promenade for visitors. The piazza’s statues commemorate the city’s major historical events.
  • Cappella Brancacci: The church of Santa Maria del Carmine is famous for the Brancacci Chapel, which contains frescoes on The Life of St. Peter.
  • Shopping in Florence: There is a kind of magic when shopping on these medieval streets. From family-run businesses, artisan workshops, high end designers, local goods, antiques, fine arts and FOOD, there are few cities comparable in size that can boast such a profusion of high quality shops.

  • Near to Florence is Pisa, known for its Duomo, Baptistery, and Campanile (Leaning Tower) which are all testaments to the city’s scientific and cultural revolution.
    • Duomo and Baptistery: Pisa’s famous Leaning Towner is now the best known building on the Campo dei Miracoli (Field of Miracles), but it was intended as a campanile to complement the Duomo which is one of the finest Pisan-Romanesque buildings in Tuscay. The Baptistery houses a marble pulpit carved with reliefs of the Nativity, the Adoration of the Magi, the Presentation, the Crucifixion and the Last Judgement.
    • The Leaning Tower of Pisa: Begun on 1173, the Leaning tower started to tilt on the sandy silt subsoil in 1274 before the 3rd story was complete – and there are 8 total. It has been defeating the laws of gravity since.

Chapter 4: Rome

(This paragraph was taken from Wikipedia – it summarizes the history better than I could have)

Rome’s history spans more than two and a half thousand years. While Roman mythology dates the founding of Rome at only around 753 BC, the site has been inhabited for much longer, making it one of the oldest continuously occupied sites in Europe. The city’s early population originated from a mix of Latins, Etruscans and Sabines. Eventually, the city successively became the capital of the Roman Kingdom, the Roman Republic and the Roman Empire, and is regarded as one of the birthplaces of Western civilisation and by some as the first ever metropolis. It was first called urbs aeterna (The Eternal City) by the Roman poet Tibullus in the 1st century BCE, and the expression was also taken up by Ovid, Virgil, and Livy. Rome is also called the “Caput Mundi” (Capital of the World).

I will return to Rome. There was not enough time to see everything and the city is truly glorious. Italy’s capital is a sprawling, cosmopolitan center with nearly 3,000 years of globally influential art, architecture and culture on display. It’s a global playground twirling with passion and energy. Rome has a bounty of things to see and the mix of its architecture is a testament to its past: ruins, baroque squares and Renaissance gardens combine to give the city its enticing edge.

Respect the Food:

  • The Flavors of Rome: Roman cooking is slow and inventive. Pasta is the vital ingredient and the best dishes are simply prepared with the freshest ingredients. I can still taste fresh vegetables (artichokes), the fruit (lemons are the size of softballs), the bucatini all’amatriciana with spicy tomato and bacon sauce. Try everything.

  • Camp De’Fiori: It use to be the place of public executions, but is now a picturesque market by day. At night, it turns into a hub for nightlifers with restaurants and bars open for business
  • Piazza Della Rotonda: City square on the south side near the Pantheon. In the center of the piazza is a fountain, the Fontana del Pantheon, surmounted by an Egyptian obelisk. La Campana is nearby – Rome’s oldest trattoria (1518).

  • Piazza Navona: The Stadium of Domitian built in the 1st century AD is here. It was an open space stadium where the ancient Romans went to watch games. It was called the Circus Agonalis (competition arena). Check out Il Cantuccio – dazzling celeb place – for a delectable Roman meal.

Must See / Excursions:

  • *The Colosseum: It’s an ancient amphitheater and Rome’s most legendary landmark. This Roman icon, where gladiator battles once entertained more than 50,000 spectators has a maze of subterranean chambers which caged the fierce animals used in the battles – over 9,000 wild animals were killed.

  • The Roman Forum: It was originally a chaotic area with food stalls, brothels, temples and the Senate House but soon became the ceremonial center of the city under the Empire. Think House of the Vestal Virgins, Temple of Castor and Pollux, The Temple of Romulus, Basilica of Constantine and Maxentius.

  • Palatine Hill: Located in the same archaeological area as The Roman Forum, this is the spot on which the first settlers built their huts, under the direction of Romulus. It is one of the seven Hills of Rome and is located in one of the most ancient parts of the city.
  • The Pantheon: This was the temple to ‘all gods’. The maze of streets around it is a mix of lively restaurants and cafes.

  • *Vatican City: The world capital of Catholicism is the world’s smallest state.

  • Tens of thousands of people visit the Vatican to see St. Peter’s Basilica, masterpieces by the likes of Michelangelo and Raphael, and the Sistine Chapel. It is a UNESCO-listed complex with a collection of galleries filled with classical and Renaissance masterpieces, including the Sistine Chapel frescoes. Stroll through rooms like the Gallery of Maps, with its golden, vaulted ceiling; the Raphael Rooms, painted by Renaissance artist Raphael; and the stunning Sistine Chapel, considered to be the Pope’s home chapel, with Michelangelo’s Creation of Adam and The Last Judgement. Finish with a visit to St. Peter’s Basilica, the largest church ever built and one of the holiest and most important sites in Christendom. The Pietà, one of Michelangelo’s earlier sculptures that depicts the body of Jesus on the lap of his mother Mary after the Crucifixion, is breathtaking. St. Peter was martyred and buried here, and became the residence of the popes who succeeded him. This was one of the most overwhelming experiences of the trip. Everything is grand and almost larger than life. You are completely humbled regardless of religious affiliation by this experience.

  • Fontana Di Trevi: Rome’s largest and most famous fountain features figures of Neptune flanked by two Tritons, one trying to master an unruly seahorse, the other leading a quieter beast, symbolizing the two contrasting gods of the sea.

  • Arch of Constantine: The triumphal arch is one of Imperial Rome’s last monuments built in AD 315 a few years before he moved the capital of the Empire to Byzantine.

  • Piazza Di Spagna and the Spanish Steps: The network of narrow streets around this Piazza forms one of the most exclusive areas of Rome – Via Condotti. This is the most famous square in Rome.

Chapter 5: Naples & Campania Region (Pompeii)

The UNESCO-listed site of Pompeii is worth the trip. After the volcano’s infamous AD 79 eruption, lava and volcanic ash destroyed the cities of Herculaneum and Pompeii. Evidence of those ancient streams of lava is still evident in the area. Once a thriving Roman city, Pompeii is best known for its archaeological digs, which are home to a wealth of relics.

There were preserved fossils and other ruins, plus plaster imprints of the town’s victims who were buried for years (there was a dog on a chain frozen in time!).

The ability to wander the streets and see how locals lived before the ashes took over is amazing. You’ll see where ancient shops, cafes and even brothels existed.

Chapter 6: Amalfi Coast

Discover one of Italy’s most beautiful stretches of coastline: The Amalfi Coast (aka: Brielle’s retirement). The picturesque towns combine stunning Italian scenery, archaeology and history.

 

The town of Amalfi was a former naval power now famous for its cliffside perch on the coast of the Tyrrenhian Sea. The views/cliffs are scary and breathtaking. Relax over a coffee or limoncello at a café.

Oh, and there is a Hotel Caruso… I think I need to stay here next time…

Chapter 7: Sicily (Palermo)

Active volcanoes, Greek ruins, remarkable landscapes? Palermo is an eclectic crossroads of Mediterranean and northern European civilization I also have a soft spot because my father’s family is from here – The mighty Caruso Clan!

*Keith and I were here in August. It’s hotter than hell. The only other place on earth we experienced such heat was XI’AN China (check out that post). We rationed water and dripped sweat but continued to explore this amazing town. The softball size rice balls and pizza fueled us…powered by pizza had a whole new meaning.

Respect the Food:

Make sure you eat!!!!! Sicilian food bears the mark of medieval influences. The Arabs introduced sugar cane, rice and certain citrus fruits, and the strong flavors of caponata (aubergine and caper salad), arancine (filled rice balls), cassata and cannoli (both filled with a sweet ricotta cream) are tasty testaments to the kind of culinary culture which evolves only over the course of centuries. Artichokes, harvested in winter and spring, are thought to be native to Sicily, while lamb and swordfish are so popular that they might almost be considered “national” dishes. Everything dish is perfection.

Must See / Excursions:

  • The Mafia (means hostility to the law) is an international organization founded in Sicily. It developed against a background of a cruel state, exploitative nobility and severe poverty. By the late 19th century it had become a criminal organization thriving on property speculation and drug trafficking.

  • Vucciria Market: Dating back 700 years, this spirited open air market is filled with more fresh food than you can imagine, Chinese imports, toys/junk, and hidden gems that are squeezed into the maze-like streets. The market has lost its tenuous links with its mafia past.

  • The Crypts

  • Teatro Massimo: Beautiful opera house located in the Piazza Verdi
  • The Casa Professa: Stunning baroque church
  • Quattro Canti Quarter (Baroque Square)

Chapter 8: Where I Still Need to Go

Milan, Naples, Sardinia, Capri – I’m coming for you!!!! #stayinspired

Ciao for now!